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First State Bank
417 N. Broadway
Opened 1904

 

James N. Patmore and his son Jay N. Patmor founded the First State Bank of Pittsburg with a charter filed on Nov 18, 1903. It opened for business on Jan. 25, 1904, in the old McKay Real Estate and Insurance building at 417 N. Broadway, with paid up capital of $25,000. The bank building was completely remodeled in 1917, receiving a new limestone front with Roman Doric style columns with the words “The First State Bank” engraved near the top of the parapet, which gave the one story building a 2-story look. The inside was divided into two spaces with the first 37 feet containing the banking rooms and teller cages and the second area containing the vault safe. The safe door was manufactured by the York Safe & Lock Company and weighed 10 tons and was operated by 24 open-hearth locking bolts that were each 11 inches in diameter.  In the public area there was room for 7000 security boxes.  Those who wanted to store larger valuables such as silver could rent larger boxes in the basement. The elder Patmore remained president of the bank until his death on Dec. 15, 1909, when his son Jay became president. Jay Nelson Patmore held that position until his death on April 16, 1972. In the mid 1970’s, the bank purchased the building north to Fifth Street, which had been the home of the First National Bank of Pittsburg from 1902 to 1932, and built an addition to the original building. The First State Bank remained a locally owned bank until the late 1990’s when it was purchased by Gold Bank, which was later, purchased by M&I Bank.

 
First State Bank
417 N. Broadway
- no postmark (c1915-1930)
 
 
 
First State Bank Vault
417 N. Broadway
- postmarked 1918
 
 
First State Bank
417 N. Broadway
- photo 2012
 
 
First State Bank
417 N. Broadway
- photo 2012
 

A New Pittsburg Bank Home

From the cut of the architect’s drawing of the new home of The First State Bank, it will be one of the most pleasing structures of the city. It will have a frontage of 35 feet on Broadway and the main banking room will extend 70 feet to the rear. Construction of the entire front will be of Indiana limestone and the design will be Roman Doric style, giving the structure artistic strength and beauty. Four large columns with caps and bases, will support a projecting cornice of limestone and above this cornice, will extend a parapet wall, giving the bank a 2-story effect. The architectural design of the exterior will be carried out in the banking room. The ceiling will be broken in panels by beams of steel, with plaster run cornice work, similar to side wall. These beams are supported off buttresses at either side of the room, giving strength to the walls and support to the beams. The main banking room will be decorated in soft tones of oil to harmonize with the wood trim. The ceilings will be in cream and the sidewalls of blue and gray. The counter screen separating the public from the banking space will be built up of polished marble and bronze and the floor of the public space of terrazzo with mosaic borders. Check desks of marble and glass and seats will be placed in the space for the convenience of the public while waiting.

Many Windows Provided
The lighting of the large banking room with the ceiling approximately 21 feet in height will be by three large windows at the front between the large stone columns, and at the rear by three large high-up windows similar to those at the front, so that at all times the working force, as well as public, will have ample light even on dark days. Whenever it will necessary to open the bank at night, up-to-date artificial lighting will flood the room with light. Hoggson Brothers, the Chicago and New York builders, recognized bank planning experts of the country, have given careful consideration to the layout to insure the greatest facility and economy of operation, while at the same time providing comfort and conveniences to the bank’s patrons. The space allotted for public use will be approximately fourteen feet wide by 37 feet in depth, and at the rear, separating the public from this space and the vault will be a heavy steel grill, which will give protection without obstruction the view of the massive round door and the well protected vault. This door manufactured by the York Safe & Lock Company, specially made for Hoggson Brothers for installation in The First State Bank, represents the best that can be provided, and is fire, burglar and fool proof. The great door weighs ten tens and is so delicately adjusted that a child can operate it in opening and closing it. It is controlled by 24 open-hearth steel locking bolts, each 11 inches in diameter, checked and governed by a three-movement, 72 hour time clock and double combination locks of the latest design, which can be changed and made to operate on 5000 different combinations.

The Interior Plans
Entering the bank through a large vestibule at the front, customers will find, on the left, quarters devoted to the officers of the bank and conveniently arranged for customers who wish to consult with them. At the right, will be found a spacious room set aside for the exclusive use of women patrons. It will be decorated in quite tones of old ivory and tastefully furnished in mahogany. Passing down through the public space they will find wickets on either side, two at the left for notes and collections, and on the right, four for receiving and paying tellers, while the space in the rear fully equipped with all modern appliances will be devoted to the bookkeepers and working forees. Room has been provided for the safety deposit department, with space for 7000 individual boxes. Commodious storage space in the basement vault, for the convenience of those who wish to store silverware and household valuables. The new building with enlarged quarters will accommodate the public to the best advantage. The exclusive new building means a great deal to the city of Pittsburg and especially to the block on with it will stand. It also testifies to the growth and development of the community, which made possible the erection of the bank’s new home. - Pittsburg Daily Headlight, Oct. 19, 1917

 
 
First State Bank Main Teller Room
417 N. Broadway
- photo, no date
 
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